Unique Charitable Giving Options

November 16, 2017

 

Article Highlights: 

  • Charitable Deduction AGI Limitations

  • Special Hurricane Relief Contribution Provisions 

  • Donations of Unused Employer Time Off 

  • Contributions of Appreciated Assets 

  • IRA to Charity Contributions 

  • Cash Contributions 

  • Non-cash Contributions 

  • Avoiding Fraudulent Charities 

The end of the year and holiday season is the time of the year when everyone is feeling charitable, and a time when you are likely flooded with solicitations for charitable contributions. Before deciding about your charitable giving for the year, you may benefit from this article on ways to contribute that will help you tax-wise. 

Some recent special tax deduction changes make 2017 a unique year for charitable giving. This article provides you a guide to these special provisions in addition to those that have historically provided tax benefits. 

Normally, deductible charitable contributions are limited by a percentage of your income, more specifically your adjusted gross income (AGI), which is the number on your tax return before your deductions and exemptions are subtracted. For most charitable contributions the tax deduction limit is 50% of your AGI, but it can drop to 30% or even 20% in certain situations. Additionally, overall itemized deductions, including those for charitable contributions, are phased out for high-income taxpayers. 

  • 2017 Hurricane Relief - After the devastation inflicted by Hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria, Congress passed a provision that allows taxpayers to donate money to hurricane relief charities without any percentage-of-AGI limitation. Further, the phaseout of itemized deductions for high-income taxpayers will also not apply to hurricane relief contributions. So, for example, if your AGI is $100,000 and you contribute $70,000 to a qualified hurricane relief charity in 2017, the full $70,000 will be deductible instead of being limited to $50,000. However, if you made other contributions during the year, they will be subject to the normal percentage-of-AGI limitations, and then the hurricane relief donation will be deductible for the balance of your AGI. 

    To qualify, the contributions must have been made in cash between August 23 and December 31, 2017, and the donation documentation must verify that the donation is for Hurricane Harvey, Irma or Maria relief. If you contribute more than is deductible for 2017, the excess will carry forward to your tax returns for up to the next five years. 

  • Donate Unused Employee Time Off - As it has done before in the wake of disasters, including Hurricane Katrina and Superstorm Sandy, the Internal Revenue Service is providing special relief that allows employees to donate their unused paid vacation, sick leave and personal leave time to Hurricane Harvey, Irma and Maria relief efforts. 

    Here is how it works: If your employer is participating, you can relinquish any unused and paid vacation time, sick leave and personal leave, and your employer will then donate the cash equivalent to Hurricane Harvey, Irma and Maria relief charities. Your employer can deduct the amount donated as a business expense. You don’t get a deduction for a charitable contribution, but better yet, you won’t have to report the income, which is beneficial for both individuals who itemize deductions and those who use the standard deduction. This special relief applies to all leave-based donations made before January 1, 2019, giving individuals over a year to forgo their unused paid vacation, sick and leave time and have the cash value donated to a worthy cause. 

    If your employer is unaware of this program, refer them to IRS Notice 2017-48 (related to Hurricane Harvey) for further details. Note: Notices 2017-52 and 2017-62 were later released, adding Irma and Maria, respectively, to the list. Your employer will also benefit from not being liable for payroll taxes on the money contributed.
     

  • Contributions of Appreciated Assets – Although this is not a new strategy, taxpayers can donate appreciated long-term capital gain assets to a charity and deduct the fair market value (FMV) of the assets as a charitable deduction. For example, suppose you donate to your church’s building fund a stock that is worth $10,000 but that only cost you $2,000. Your charitable contribution would be $10,000, and you do not have to pay tax on the $8,000 appreciation in the stock. This strategy can also apply to land, homes, rentals, equipment, etc. Determining the FMV for listed stock is easy since the value of the stock can be determined from quoted stock prices on the day of the contribution. For other capital assets, a certified appraisal is generally required. It would be good practice to contact this office before making a gift of appreciated property to make sure that it is appropriate for your tax bracket and that the appraisal is properly performed and documented. 
     

  • IRA to Charity Contributions – For some time this unique method of making charitable contributions was a temporary provision of the tax law, but Congress made it permanent in 2016. This charitable contribution provision is limited to taxpayers age 70.5 and older. They can directly transfer up to $100,000 a year from their IRA to a qualified charity. So if you are 70.5 or older and make an IRA-to-charity transfer you won’t get a charity deduction, but instead and even better, you will not have to pay taxes on the distribution, and because your AGI will be lower, you can benefit from other tax provisions that are pegged to AGI, such as the amount of Social Security income that’s taxable and the cost of Medicare B insurance premiums for higher-income taxpayers. As an additional bonus, the transfer also counts toward your annual required minimum distribution. 
     

  • Cash Contributions - Cash contributions include those paid by cash, check, electronic funds transfer, or credit card. To claim a cash contribution, you must be able to document that contribution with a bank record, receipt, or a written communication from the qualified organization; this record must include the name of the qualified organization, the date of the contribution, and the amount of the contribution. Valid types of bank records include canceled checks, bank or credit union statements, and credit card statements. In